Coatings Session 3
 
17 August, Wednesday - Selangor 1 Room - 1:30pm - 3:15pm

Chair : Rehan Ahmed, Petronas Carigali

Technical Trend of Silicone Resin Heat Resistant Paint & Test Method

17 August, Wednesday - Selangor 1 Room - 1:35pm - 2:05pm

Bio of Speaker

Abstract

Heat resistant paint is on the market of plant and oil & gas industry for protection. Silicone resin based paint is the typical heat resistant paint but sometimes cracking or flaking may occur due to its curing mechanism and physical property. And measures against corrosion by heat cyclic condition or corrosion under insulation are also required from the market. Though paints development for the above problem solution has been progressing, standard paint testing method has not been established and various trials have been attempted. This report shows current situation of heat resistant paint development and trial of testing method establishment.

Designing PFP For Jet Fires to API 2218

17 August, Wednesday - Selangor 1 Room - 2:10pm - 2:40pm

Bio of Speaker

Abstract

Name:  John Yeoh
Title / Position:    Regional PFP Manager
Company:  PPG Protective and Marine Coatings
CH Yeoh came from a marine engineering background and started his career in the Republic of Singapore Navy where he served various appointment onboard naval vessels from Navigating Officer to marine Engineering Officer. 
After leaving the Navy, CH Yeoh has been working for protective coating companies for more than 15 years and had held various positions from Sales manager (Protective Coatings), Product Manager (Passive Fire Protection – PFP) to Head of Sales (PFP – Asia Pacific).  Currently, CH Yeoh is the Regional PFP Manager for PPG Protective and Marine Coatings.
Following the Valero incident in America, the need to designing fire protection against jet fires has been highlighted by the US Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB).  The CSB's accident investigation findings have led to a revision of the API guidance on fire protection, API 2218, but it is unclear how this revision should be applied to design of PFP.  This paper will look at some of the key details of PFP design and the application of an Intrinsically Safe Design concept to demonstrate compliance with the intent of API 2218. 

A Review of the Robustness of Epoxy Passive Fire Protection (PFP) to Offshore Environments 

17 August, Wednesday - Selangor 1 Room - 2:45pm - 3:15pm

Bio of Speaker

Abstract

Name: Derek Ng
Title / Position:  Regional Chartek Market Manager
Company:  AkzoNobel
  
Derek joined International Paint (a business unit of AkzoNobel) in 2011 and is based in Singapore, supporting the hydrocarbon passive fire protection business in the region.
                                                 
Role includes working with clients to provide optimized solutions to meet their fire protection requirements, leveraging on International Paint’s global network of resources and experience in the field.
 
Derek obtained a Bachelor of Science (Materials Science) from the National University of Singapore and has a diverse background ranging from field application to marketing in various disciplines.
Intumescent fire protection products which swell and char in reaction to the heat of a fire, have been
with us for decades. These coatings may be water based, solvent based or solvent free. 100% solids
epoxy intumescent passive fire protection materials (Epoxy PFP) were introduced to the Oil & Gas
market in 1974. Prior to this date, other materials had been used in external applications in the Oil &
Gas industry with varying levels of success and, in some cases, were found to lose the majority of their
fire protection capability due to leaching out of active ingredients after exposure to offshore weather
conditions.
Essentially, the ingredients which cause fire protection materials to intumesce, and provide thermal
protection, are very similar across a broad spectrum of products. The binder in which these
intumescent ingredients are dispersed is the key to longevity and durability when considering fire
protection and corrosion resistance. A loss of performance over time can result in the costly need to reapply
the Epoxy PFP or operators will run the risk of inadequate performance in the unfortunate event
of a fire.
Epoxy PFP has consistently proven to be superior with over 30 years of real time experience in severe
environments around the globe. For most of the life of an Epoxy PFP, the primary function is that of a
barrier coat to prevent the corrosion of the steel substrate and protection is required for the lifetime of
the facility.
However, this paper shows that all Epoxy PFP are not the same with regard to corrosion protection and
product stability under stress, particularly in environments described as C5-M as per ISO 12944. Topcoats
cannot be relied upon to maintain the integrity of the Epoxy PFP, particularly considering that the
material is a safety critical element in the design. Inherent resistance of the Epoxy PFP to periodic
immersion and atmospheric weathering is therefore a pre-requisite when considering selection.