Chemical Treatment Session 
 
17 August, Wednesday - Perak Room - 1:30pm - 3:15pm

Chair : Mohd Farid Mohamed, Petronas GTS

Hydrostatic testing: The Importance of Chemical Addition in Protecting and Maintaining Pipeline Integrity

17 August, Wednesday - Perak Room - 1:35pm - 2:05pm

Bio of Speaker

Abstract

Hydrostatic testing, also referred to as hydrotesting, is an essential process in pipeline construction and is a means of signifying the capabilities of a pipeline for service. Nevertheless, using large quantities of untreated or poorly treated water as a pressurized medium during the hydrotest will in turn induce corrosion problems. The large volumes of water pumped into the pipeline during flooding will often contain high levels of dissolved oxygen and when left in a stagnant state provide an ideal breeding ground for microbial growth. Ensuring the pipeline is protected during the hydrotest is essential. This is where the addition of chemicals such as oxygen scavengers, corrosion inhibitors and biocides provide crucial support in removing these corrosion inducing issues and assist in mitigating microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) and dissolved oxygen corrosion from occurring.
Closely monitoring chemical dosing during the flooding of the pipeline is essential in minimizing long term corrosion effects. This can be achieved by onsite testing at a sample point downstream of the chemical injection points which will provide valuable information on chemical efficiency during real-time operations. Further monitoring during the dewatering phase will provide additional information and provide the first indications of any problems.
Protecting pipelines from degradation and corrosion is a substantial undertaking particularly in regions with warm climates and high humidity, in conditions where the ambient environment is conducive to the growth of macro and micro biofilms, inherently turns a relatively straightforward job into more of a challenge.

Challenges of corrosion Inhibitor qualification testing for deepwater project

17 August, Wednesday - Perak Room - 2:10pm - 2:40pm

Bio of Speaker

Abstract

Name:  Mohd Hafiz Zakaria
Title / Position:  Senior Inspection Engineer
Company:  Sarawak Shell Berhad
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Hafiz Zakaria is currently a Senior Inspection Engineer with Sarawak Shell Berhad based in Miri responsible for providing Materials, Corrosion & Inspection (MCI) and Asset Integrity technical support to Shell offshore oil and gas facilities in Sarawak and Sabah including Gumusut Kakap (GK).
Hafiz started his career with Shell in 2007 at Shell MDS onshore downstream gas-to-liquid facility in Bintulu, Sarawak. In 2012, he joined upstream GK deepwater project as a Senior MCI Engineer where he develops a passion in various MCI areas including Shell RBI (Risk Based Inspection) programme, Integrity Operating Window (IOW) monitoring and Corrosion Inhibitor (CI) selection and testing.
Corrosion inhibitor qualification testing for a production flowline of a deepwater project may need a different approach than a shallow water project. Existing off-the-shelves corrosion inhibitor for shallow water project may not meet the screening criteria as deepwater project typically has a more stringent requirement on viscosity and pour point to avoid solidification of corrosion inhibitor in the umbilical. Thus, a custom corrosion inhibitor may need to be formulated for a specific project. In addition, this custom corrosion inhibitor has to be tested for performance compatibility with the other chemicals utilized in the project. These, together with other additional challenges such as high shear requirement demonstrate that the corrosion inhibitor qualification testing for a production flowline deepwater project may need a different approach. Purpose of this presentation is to elaborate these challenges and the potential solutions as more oil and gas companies continue to invest in deepwater projects. 

Investigation of microbial growth and microbiologically influenced corrosion in enhanced oil recovery

17 August, Wednesday - Perak Room - 2:45pm - 3:15pm

Bio of Speaker

Abstract

Name: Hasrizal Abd Rahman
Title / Position:  Senior Researcher (Corrosion Engineering)Senior Researcher
Company:  Group Research & Technology, PETRONAS

Hasrizal Abd Rahman graduated from Universiti Malaysia Sabah in September 2007 with Bachelor Degree with Honors in Biotechnology. Joint PETRONAS in October 2007, as an executive and currently he is a Senior Researcher in Hydrocarbon Recovery, Group Research & Technology, PETRONAS. With the knowledge in microbiology, he was chosen to be a member of a task force, which specifically being tasked to study on the Microbiological Induced Corrosion at Sarawak Operations (SKO) in 2009.  He was also gained experiences from his job attachment at various PETRONAS offices and overseas partner’s offices/laboratories. In 2012, he joint Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) research group. Among his key achievement for EOR R&D group are; alternative material for downhole tubing, corrosion study on the effect of EOR towards materials, and recently he is leading a project which focusing on studying the effect of EOR chemicals towards Microbial Induced Corrosion (MIC), in collaboration with Ohio University.
Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is an increasingly important problem in the oil and gas industry. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is now practiced more often than ever. Seawater is often injected to increase reservoir pressure. Polymer solutions are sometimes used as well to increase production. Such practices bring nutrients and microbes downhole. Sulfate combined with other nutrients in the seawater may result in souring due to biogenic H2S production by SRB as well as MIC pitting against downhole tubing. The polymers have the potential of becoming organic carbon sources for some microbes. D-amino acids are naturally occurring. It has been proven that D-amino acids are biocide enhancers in lab tests aimed at pipeline applications. They enhance biocides such as tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium sulfate (THPS) synergistically against oilfield biofilm consortia and MIC. However, their efficacies need to be demonstrated in the downhole environment under the influence of EOR chemicals before they can be field-tested for downhole applications. The objectives of this lab work were to investigate whether some of the EOR chemicals might be readily utilized by microbes and whether the biocide enhances could maintain their efficacies under EOR conditions. Tests were carried out in 120 ml anaerobic vials using enriched field-collected injection seawater. A tough oilfield biofilm consortium containing various microbes including sulfate reducing bacteria was used as a biofilm model. Planktonic cell count, sessile cell count, biofilm image, pit image, weight loss data were analyzed. Experimental results indicated that EOR polymers did not impact microbial growth in 7-day, 14-day and 21-day tests and EOR chemicals did not adversely impact the efficacies of the enhanced biocide system. For the first time D-amino acids were tested as biocide enhancers for downhole applications.